Monthly Archives: July 2020

Common Signs of Well Water Problems, Part 2

In part one of this two-part blog series, we went over some of the common issues that may show themselves within your water well system. While proper maintenance should prevent most or all of these concerns from cropping up, there are some cases where they will make themselves known when the issue becomes significant enough – and you need to be able to recognize the signs.

At Mike Zimmerman Well Service LLC, we’re proud to offer quality well rehabilitation and repair services in addition to our water well drilling and installation solutions. We’ve seen every potential sign of water well issues taking place, and we know precisely how to get to the bottom of them and find you the most cost-effective solution. Here are a few other areas to keep an eye (and an ear, and a nose) on, plus what can be done about some of the issues these concerns may be signaling.

signs well water problems

Use Your Senses

We mentioned sounds in part one of our series, but they’re far from the only potential use of your senses that might come in handy when identifying concerns with water wells. A few other senses to keep in mind here:

  • Taste: We all know how clean and healthy water should taste, so if you notice a major difference here in your water – such as a metallic taste, which could signal high iron or manganese levels – there could be an issue.
  • Smell: Water may also smell different than it should normally, such as a sulfur or rotten egg smell that may take place due to hydrogen sulfide entering the groundwater through decaying organic matter.
  • Appearance: Water may look several unusual colors or hues, each of which might signal various particles that are present. If your water is any strange color, call our team and describe it to learn more.

Well Cap Issues

You should be periodically checking the top of your well casing, where the well cap cover should be properly covering the entire area. If it’s been damaged in any way, insects may make it inside and contaminate the water, leading to major issues. Confirm the cap is at least six inches off the ground, in proper working order and not being impacted by plants or other growths in the area.

Contamination Signs

Finally, there are several possible contaminants that may make it into your water if you don’t take the right precautions. Some of these and their common indicators:

  • Salt: In a place like Utah where salt is regularly used on roads, salt can infuse into well water and impact its quality, impacting taste and leaving a residue behind. The most common indicator here is simply the recent laying of salt on the roads, after which you should pay close attention to your water.
  • Hard water: Hard water from the well may signal groundwater seeping into the water supply, allowing various minerals and potential contaminants.
  • Agricultural runoff: This is one area where signs are tough to pick up, as nitrates – the most common contaminants from agricultural runoff – are colorless, odorless and tasteless. This is an area that indicates the importance of testing well water regularly, as certain contaminants may not give off signs.

For more on possible signs of issues with your water well, or to learn about any of our well drilling or repair services, speak to the staff at Mike Zimmerman Well Service LLC today.

Common Signs of Well Water Problems, Part 1

Water wells, both private and commercial, require standard maintenance and attention throughout their lifespans to ensure they operate properly. Such maintenance should generally be carried out before any significant issues take place – but in some cases, such issues will give you strong signs that such maintenance or repairs are necessary on your water well.

At Mike Zimmerman Well Service LLC, we’re here to help with a variety of quality water well repair and rehabilitation services. We’ve assisted clients with issues ranging from pumps and pressure concerns to contaminants and health hazards, ensuring your water is both plentiful and healthy at all times. In this two-part blog series, we’ll go over several potential signs of problems taking place in your water well, plus how they can be remedied.

signs well water problems

Sudden Electrical Bill Spike

One of the simplest and most prominent signs of issues in the water well is a sudden jump in your electric bill at the end of a given month. Many problems within a given water well will force the system to work harder – a clog in a pipe will put extra strain on the pump, for instance, as will a breakdown of a check valve or a broken pipe that leads to water leakage and forces a greater supply to be used.

All of these concerns will lead to more work for the pump or other components, and these require electricity. If you notice a sudden spike in your bill that doesn’t have another simple explanation, an issue with the water well is often the culprit.

Strange Noises

Are you hearing sounds like groaning, moaning, humming, grinding or even growling coming from your water pipes or the well pump? These signal pump issues, and you should contact our team right away to investigate the issue before potentially hazardous concerns take place.

Sputtering Faucets

Many of us have experienced the frustration of a sputtering faucet in the past: Blasts of air with little shots of water here and there, then hopefully a normal flow of water afterward (though not always). This is a sign there’s too much air present in your plumbing system, often tracing back to issues with the well pump that may trace back to a failed valve.

In other situations, the problem could be due to a drop pipe that’s connected to the pump experiencing damage. In still other cases, the well pump itself may need to be placed in a lower location because your water table has dropped, meaning the pump is mistakenly drawing in too much air instead of water.

For more on possible water well problems and the signs they’ll give you, or to learn about any of our water well drilling or rehabilitation services, speak to the staff at Mike Zimmerman Well Service LLC today.